Interpreting the Side Imaging View

Read here first, to learn about Side Imaging Technology
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Craig
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Location: Guilford, Indiana
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Interpreting the Side Imaging View

Post by Craig » Mon May 14, 2007 7:07 pm

Taken from Humminbird.com

Interpreting the Side Imaging View

The Side Imaging “picture” is very different than a traditional sonar view, but is easily understood with just a couple of basic tips. First, since Side Imaging looks to the sides, the position of your boat is moved to the top middle of the screen and is represented by a boat icon. Sonar returns coming from the left and right side of boat are drawn on the corresponding side of this icon. The most current sonar information appears at the top of the screen, and the older sonar history scrolls towards the bottom. Second, when the sonar ping is first emitted, it travels through the “water column” that shows up as a dark, symmetrical band down the middle of the screen. This band will show returns from fish, structure and other objects below and slightly to the sides of boat. The left and right edges of the water column vary as the depth changes - much like traditional sonar, but turned 90 degrees. Lastly, once Side Imaging profiles the bottom below the boat, it continues to look further and further to the sides of the boat to define the bottom contour out to 360 feet using a topographic style shaded image. Remember, Side Imaging uses sonar, so strong sonar returns appear bright and weak sonar returns appear dark. To gain the most from this image, just apply these rules of thumb:

* Lighter shades of blue typically represent terrain rising from the bottom. Sometimes, very hard bottoms caused by solid rock surfaces also appear as whiter shades.
* Neutral shades of blue represent flatter terrain.
* Dark shades of blue represent descending terrain.
* Objects standing off the bottom typically appear as a bright spot or clearly defined bright shape with an adjacent dark “sonar shadow”. This shadow is not caused by light, but is actually the lack of sonar return because the object has already reflected the sonar energy. Generally, long shadows indicate the object is tall, and small shadows indicate a short object. Its important to note the shadow will often tell you more about the object than the primary sonar reflection. Objects suspended off the bottom (fish) do not have an adjacent shadow; often you can see a shadow, but at some distance away from the object. The greater this distance, the further the object is off the bottom.



Image

Image

bogdan.andries
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 1:44 pm

Re: Interpreting the Side Imaging View

Post by bogdan.andries » Sat Jan 10, 2009 1:51 pm

Craig wrote:Taken from Humminbird.com

Interpreting the Side Imaging View

The Side Imaging “picture” is very different than a traditional sonar view, but is easily understood with just a couple of basic tips. First, since Side Imaging looks to the sides, the position of your boat is moved to the top middle of the screen and is represented by a boat icon. Sonar returns coming from the left and right side of boat are drawn on the corresponding side of this icon. The most current sonar information appears at the top of the screen, and the older sonar history scrolls towards the bottom. Second, when the sonar ping is first emitted, it travels through the “water column” that shows up as a dark, symmetrical band down the middle of the screen. This band will show returns from fish, structure and other objects below and slightly to the sides of boat. The left and right edges of the water column vary as the depth changes - much like traditional sonar, but turned 90 degrees. Lastly, once Side Imaging profiles the bottom below the boat, it continues to look further and further to the sides of the boat to define the bottom contour out to 360 feet using a topographic style shaded image. Remember, Side Imaging uses sonar, so strong sonar returns appear bright and weak sonar returns appear dark. To gain the most from this image, just apply these rules of thumb:

* Lighter shades of blue typically represent terrain rising from the bottom. Sometimes, very hard bottoms caused by solid rock surfaces also appear as whiter shades.
* Neutral shades of blue represent flatter terrain.
* Dark shades of blue represent descending terrain.
* Objects standing off the bottom typically appear as a bright spot or clearly defined bright shape with an adjacent dark “sonar shadow”. This shadow is not caused by light, but is actually the lack of sonar return because the object has already reflected the sonar energy. Generally, long shadows indicate the object is tall, and small shadows indicate a short object. Its important to note the shadow will often tell you more about the object than the primary sonar reflection. Objects suspended off the bottom (fish) do not have an adjacent shadow; often you can see a shadow, but at some distance away from the object. The greater this distance, the further the object is off the bottom.



Image

Image
I WANT TO BUY A 798 AND I DO NOT UNDERSTAND EXACTLY HOW I WILL UNDERSTAND THE IMAGES POSTED ON THE SCREEN. IS IT ANY TRAINING FILM WITH CLEAR VIDEOUS FROM UNDRWATER TO COMPARE THE IMAGE FROM SIDE IMAGE WITH REAL BOTTOM STRUCTURE SO WE CAN LEARN EASIER HOW IT WORKS?

arronlee
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:06 am

Re: Interpreting the Side Imaging View

Post by arronlee » Tue Feb 25, 2014 10:05 pm

Hi, WZX123.
I wonder have you ever used any 3rd party
imaging tools to help you with the related image viewing projects? I am testing about the related projects these days. Do you have any ideas about it? Or any good suggestion? Thanks in advance.



Best regards,
Arron

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